For hiring managers, the job is never done. There is no point during your work process when you can sit down and consider a work slowdown phase as a time to relax. To make sure that you and your department are always on the ball when it comes to managing staffing changes, including internal and external hiring, it is necessary to maintain a database of prospective hires. Creating a talent pool that you can tap when the need arises ensures that your department is responsive to rapid, and even emergency, staffing challenges. This also means that as a hiring manager, you are constantly networking with your peers in the industry even if you are competing for the same talent. Staying on top of industry trends and best practices is one way of making sure that you practice proactive strategies to support your organization’s mission. Listed here are some online sources relevant to your efforts:

1. Social Media

According to Internet Live Stats, close to 90 percent of the U.S. population are on the Internet and social media is one of the reasons driving digital engagement. As a hiring manager, you will find many opportunities to discover fresh talent among users and members of these websites. LinkedIn tops the list of social media sites for professionals. This is a robust site that provides complete member bios, the ability to contact an individual or a targeted selection of members. Facebook is also a useful resource, but the thrust is more individual rather than professional. Hiring managers have been known to check out the Facebook profiles of shortlisted candidates to get a glimpse of their background.

2. Job Boards

Hiring managers are some of the most active users of job boards where opportunities are posted and databases filtered for potential talent. Career Builder is one of the most popular job boards because it works with organizations and industry associations to keep the listings up-to-date. Indeed.com and simplyhired.com post jobs for entry-level and some managerial positions. When it comes to executive positions, Ladders.com leads this area although access requires a paid membership.

Specialized job boards focus on a particular sector or profession. There are job boards specifically for the medical profession, engineers, scientists and others. If your hiring need is very specific as to the skills required, these specialized job boards may offer solutions to your hiring challenges.

3. Industry Associations

Not all industry associations offer a database of members that would be useful to talent identification. However, almost all of these organizations provide useful information about industry trends, statistics and practices that may be helpful in creating job description or designing competitive benefits and compensation plans.

4. Industry-related Resources

HR.com provides hiring managers with the latest information on industry certifications and training and development opportunities. The site shares strategies and advise from top-level HR practitioners. For recruiters and hiring managers who value self-development, this is a valuable resource defining and meeting your career development goals.

5. Online Tools Relevant to HR Practices

Apparently, there is an app for everything and the field of HR is not an exemption. There are resources that provide templates for interviewing at various levels and plugins that make it easier to perform background checks on candidates. These tools simplify the recruitment process, enhancing the hiring manager’s productivity levels. The Interview Guide and Flacon, a Chrome plugin, should be part of every hiring manager’s toolbox.

The job of the hiring manager has evolved from that of paper shuffling to one that is technology-driven. With the right tools and resources, performing your tasks has become a seamless process that yields more focused, relevant results. Take advantage of these resources to enhance your efficiency and productivity.